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Product Review – Aqua Carpatica

How much water do you drink? I’m guessing more than the average Joe/Jo, because if you’re reading this you’re probably a healthy(ish) sort. Do you drink bottled water? Or are you (like my Other Half) the sort of person who thinks all water is basically the same, so why pay for something that’s no different/better than what Yorkshire Water sends out of our taps?

Personally I like to drink at least a couple of pints of water every day in addition to any other drinks I have – which are, admittedly, mostly coffee and tea. I find I start to feel a bit tired and headachey by lunchtime if I don’t. I generally drink tap water at home. At work we have a fancy thing that does either boiling or filtered chilled water, which is fine. But I like some mineral waters and I do buy them occasionally. I use cheap Morrison’s Yorkshire Vale water to make a fizzy drink with fruit juice. I love Evian, but usually only drink it when I’m on holiday in France, where it’s much cheaper than the UK. If I need a still, bottled water in this country I choose Harrogate Spring Water if I can because it’s local (and nice) And I like to drink Badoit, which has a slightly savoury tang, with a nice meal if I’m not having wine. My OH thinks Badoit tastes “like farts”, but each to their own! Then again, Vichy water, which many French people swear by for its health properties, is a salty step too far even for me. So when I was sent some new Aqua Carpatica to try I was interested to see how it compared to waters I’m familiar with. Because when you start to dig down into the detail, all waters are not created equal by any means – it’s the varying mineral content of the different waters that makes some taste sweet and others like farts!

Aqua Carpatica comes from the Carpathain mountains in Romania, a rugged and romantic forest landscape full of wolves and bears – proper fairly tale stuff! It’s produced by many years of volcanic action, much like other popular waters such as Evian and Volvic. So far, so standard. But the USP of Aqua Carpatica is that it’s extremely low in sodium and nitrates, both of which are issues for some people. Personally I don’t worry too much about sodium as I have low blood pressure, but obviously if you’ve been advised to follow a low sodium diet you wouldn’t want to drink water that contains lots of it. And if you’re concerned about environmental toxins you presumably don’t want to be consuming nitrates. So from that point of view Aqua Carpatica has a lot going for it.

This stuff certainly tastes good; very clean and sweet – much like Evian in fact. And it comes in a very cool square bottle, which wouldn’t look out of place at a dinner party or in a fancy restaurant. However, I was interested to see how Aqua Carpatica’s mineral content (mg per litre) stacked up against my usual waters, so did a little comparison.

 

Water

Sodium

Calcium Magnesium

Nitrates

Still

       

Evian

6.5 80 26 3.7

Harrogate

42 46 13

<1

Tap

14.8 71 8.2

13.39

Aqua Carpatica 0.6 49 15

<0.7

Sparkling

       

Badoit

165 190 85

5

Yorkshire Vale

7.6

2.2 0.8

0.1

Aqua Carpatica 4.9 274 78

0

 

I’d never bothered doing this in any detail before and found it quite interesting. I got the analysis of my tap water by simply typing my postcode into the Yorkshire Water website – you may be able to do the same with your water provider. It seems that different waters are good for different things – depending on what you’re looking for!

So how do the scores stack up? Personally I Iike a water that has a good 2:1 balance of calcium and magnesium – hence my preference for Harrogate and Badoit. Aqua Carpatica has a lot of calcium in it, which I guess may appeal to some people. The still version apparently has the lowest sodium level of any bottled water. My cheapo Yorkshire Vale doesn’t have much calcium or magnesium in it – but it’s also low in sodum and nitrates. The tap water certainly has the highest level of nitrates, whilst Aqua Carpatica obviously has the lowest. Incidentally, you can’t remove nitrates from tap water by using a simple jug filter such as a Brita; you need a fancy reverse osmosis system to do that.

I haven’t drawn any major conclusion here, apart from it’s probably worth looking into the composition of any water you’re drinking to see what’s in it; and if you’re looking for a low sodium option Aqua Carpatica seems like a good bet. If you’re interested in trying it, it’s available at Tesco and Ocado.

What do you think about water? I’d be really interested to hear your thoughts on how much you drink, what type and why.

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