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Race Review – Hardmoors Roseberry Topping Half Marathon 2018

I love Hardmoors events, so as soon as Roseberry Topping opened for entry I was in. Only the half this time mind you, as it would be December and the weather might be rubbish. At that point I hadn’t even looked at the route, so didn’t twig that we’d actually be going up and down Yorkshire’s own Matterhorn not once but twice. And I didn’t know about the Tees Link either, a steep, muddy slope that we’d have to go up on the way out and down on the way back. But, as someone once said, ignorance is bliss, isn’t it? It was only in the week before the event that I found out about the double ascent, descent, and noticed folk on the Hardmoors Facebook page saying that heavy rain had turned the Link into a sea of mud. OK then!

The race starts and finishes in Guisborough, at the Sea Cadets HQ. As usual, there was a marathon, half and 10K setting off at various times. After several days of rain, the weather on the day was gorgeous; bright and cold with only a little wind. We set off on a gentle incline out of town and through Guisborough Woods.

Much of the race takes place on the Cleveland Way, and to get up there the infamous Tees Link has to be negotiated. On this particular occasion the rain had turned it into a sea of mud.

Not only was it impossible to run up, it was quite a challenge to simply remain upright – and a fair few people didn’t! We slithered our way up, making very slow progress. I thought to myself how much easier this would be with poles to give you something to hang onto. We finally (literally) hauled ourselves over the top onto the Cleveland Way at High Cliff Nab. The view to the sea from the top was spectacular though. Myself and a girl I’d been chatting with couldn’t resist stopping to take photos of each other. And have a breather!

From there it was easier progress for a couple of miles, then we approached Roseberry Topping. This was an amazing sight, rising up against the blue sky with its distinctive curved summit. We ascended one side of it, went down another, came back up the same way and then descended a different route on the other side.

The whole thing was only about a mile, but took me nearly half an hour! Going up isn’t actually that bad, as there are large stones that almost form steps. Going down is a bit more treacherous, especially as the stones were wet, there were runners further ahead coming back up as we went down, as well as members of the general public with dogs/children etc to contend with. But it was quite fun! I didn’t hang around on the top, as it was quite windy and I didn’t want to get cold. Again, I wished I had poles for the descents. We then had some lovely downhill for a while, before another climb up to Captain Cook’s monument.

The course then undulated for a few miles until we turned back towards Guisborough. I was finding it tough and felt more tired that I thought I would. I was really glad I was only doing the half and not the full marathon! I began to wonder if I should have entered the Hardmoors 50 in March, which would be along similar terrain but a lot longer. I knew there was still time for me to withdraw my application and get most of my entry fee back. The kind of negative thoughts that creep in when you don’t feel too good!

At one point I got cramp in my inner thigh, which I’ve never had before and was horrible! Luckily it went off after a bit of rubbing, and towards the end I rallied a bit after taking a gel.

We then had the fun of coming back along the Tees Link, with more slipping and sliding down the slope. Everyone was in good spirits though, and we had a nice downhill run back into Guisborough. I even managed a bit of a ‘sprint’ finish! My time was 3:47 – my slowest half marathon ever, but also the hardest! I thought I’d been rubbish; then I found out later that my friend Robyn, who would normally knock off a road marathon in around three hours, had taken 6:20 for this one (and was third woman!) so I didn’t feel so bad. Everyone received a coveted Hardmoors t-shirt and medal, and the tea and mince pies afterwards were very welcome.

This is a great event, but one not to be underestimated. It’s a tough course, with a ten hour cut-off for the marathon, so don’t come expecting a PB. But if you like big hills – and mud – it’s a winner! I’m sure it must have been brilliant training. The day after, I woke up with a sore throat, which developed into a stinking cold, so I’m hoping that’s why I didn’t feel brilliant while I was running. I haven’t withdrawn my entry to the 50. But I am hoping Santa will bring me some good poles…

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