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Race Review – Hardmoors Rosedale Marathon 2018

The Hardmoors Rosedale Marathon kind of snuck up on me! When I got back from my holiday in France I realised it was only a week away. I was really looking forward to it, but at the same time kind of wishing I hadn’t spent the previous fortnight consuming my own weight in pastry and wine, although I had also managed to run up and down a few hills. I was hoping the weather would cool down a bit beforehand, but unfortunately there was no sign of the heatwave ending any time soon.

The Rosedale races start and finish at Hutton-le-Hole, a pretty village near Pickering. I arrived about an hour before kick off, got through kit check and number issue at the village hall very quickly, slathered myself with P30 sunscreen and had plenty of time for loo visits! A sign outside the building stating ‘Fun Run Registration’ made me chuckle. At the race briefing, Hardmoors head man Jon Steele announced that the marathon was 28 miles long. One of the great things about Hardmoors events is that you always get ‘value for money’, because the distances are always longer than they should be. Of course, trail events are rarely measured to the millimetre, but part of the fun at Hardmoors is finding out exactly how far you’ve actually run at the end.

We set off at 9am. The air temperature was really pleasant at this point, but I realised it was set to get a lot warmer and needed to remember to drink plenty. I hadn’t taken my Camelbak bladder, as I knew there were checkpoints every few miles where I’d be able to refill my soft flask, but I did take some High 5 Zero electrolyte tabs with me to add to my water. The first few miles of the course were really enjoyable with gently undulating hills, some of which were runnable. I idly wondered whether I’d be able to finish this one a bit quicker than the White Horse in June, which had twice as much elevation.

At around 9 miles I passed through the second checkpoint, where my friend Mandy was helping out, and missed a right hand turn. Hardmoors courses have yellow ribbons tied in strategic places to show you where to go, as well as marshals at some turning points. It’s actually quite hard to get lost at these events, which is one of the reasons l like them; but I ran too far down a hill, realised I was totally on my own, ran back up again and saw where I’d gone wrong. This probably added on about half a mile and really annoyed me! Nevertheless, I got to the halfway point in about three hours, so was cautiously optimistic about finishing in around six.

Timing is pretty old school at Hardmoors events; no chips, just marshals ticking off your number on a clipboard as you pass through the checkpoints. These were all well stocked with water, peanuts and jelly sweets; I ate a few of each at every point. In the second half they also offered Pepsi, Irn Bru, ginger beer and biscuits. Pepsi or Coke always goes down well with me! The marshals were lovely, helping to fill water bottles and checking everyone was OK in the heat. There were also a couple of unofficial supporter points, one of which featured a massive inflatable dinosaur!

The second half was much tougher than the first, and I did quite a bit of walking. Not only was it hotter, but the route became more hilly and less shady in the full sun. Many of the paths were quite hard and stony underfoot, and there was also quite a lot of single track through heather moorland that was really narrow and scratchy; not easy to run on, even going downhill. But the spectacular scenery more than made up for the difficulties, and I was really enjoying myself despite the heat and hills.

With only just over 100 people running the marathon we got quite strung out in the second half, and I found myself running pretty much on my own for much of the time, but I didn’t mind. It was quite nice and peaceful to be alone amidst the blue sky, swathes of bright purple heather and dramatic moorland views, but still have the comfort blanket of a marked course.

As I reached the last checkpoint, at 26 miles, a marshal asked me if I’d like to refill my water bottle. “But it’s only a couple more miles now, isn’t it?” I asked. “Four from here!” he replied. Four? Surely he must have got that wrong if it’s 28 miles. But no, he was right, and it turned out to be 30 miles – extra value for money! Fortunately the sky had clouded over a bit by now and it was slightly cooler. The last couple of miles were a lovely gentle downhill through some woods and along the road back to Hutton-le-Hole. As we ran through the village, runners who had already finished and other people who were around clapped and shouted encouragement, which was great. I’d absolutely loved the run, but was also really glad to finish!

We all received a really nice t-shirt and medal at the end, and there were refreshments in the village hall. My official time was 6:57. I was a bit disappointed with this at first, but soon realised that everyone had struggled with the heat and been pretty slow! I was pleased to discover I’d come second in the FV50 category and 64th out of the 113 marathon finishers.

I really recommend Hardmoors events. Don’t be put off by the name! They are very friendly and inclusive, well organised and marked, and very popular – you need to be ready to enter as soon as places go on sale. There are always marathon, half marathon and 10K options available. I’m already signed up for the Hardmoors Princess in September, the Roseberry Half in December and the Hardmoors 50 next March (eek). I’ll also be entering the Saltburn Marathon next February when it goes on sale later this month. All good training for my big challenge next summer… watch this space!

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