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The London Marathon was a fantastic event, but Race to the Stones is now looming on the horizon, so I need to start preparing for that. I’ve already been including hills in some of my long marathon training runs, and also completed a couple of hilly events, like the Temple Newsam Trails half marathon. Hopefully that will have set me off to a good start, but I know that I now need to do as many hills as possible and work on building strength rather than focusing on pace and speed. My post-London plan was to have an easy week immediately afterwards, then start to follow the training plan on the Race to the Stones website, which looks like this:

 

So after just a short recovery run mid-week I headed to my new favourite training ground, Temple Newsam, for a few easy trail miles a week later. And midway through the run I felt a little niggle in my right hamstring – the same side as I had my hamstring tendon injury nearly two years ago. I gave it a little massage and a stretch and hoped it would settle down. But during a short run on Monday it felt no better, so I took myself off to see Jeroen at Jorvik Physiotherapy. After a bit of poking around Jeroen told me it was the muscle on the outside edge of the hamstring group that was the culprit (the one on the right in this picture) and that it was good news as it didn’t seem to be the tendon this time; it was just a bit tired and sore post-marathon.

 

Jeroen gave me some ultrasound treatment and told me to take it easy for a couple of weeks, which basically means no speed work, no hills and no racing. Thankfully I can still run, but if the muscle starts to play up I’ll have to back off and rest it. I can cycle if I want to, but I’d rather not if I can run. This isn’t great news training-wise, but it could have been worse, and I have to do everything I can to ensure I reach the start of Race to the Stones injury-free – especially as many people have now kindly donated to my Just Giving page for Cancer Research UK.

I was really disappointed to have to miss the North Lincolnshire Half on Sunday. I did this race for the first time and it’s fab – you can read my review of it here. I managed to achieve sub 1:50 for the first time thanks to their brilliant pacers, and was looking forward to having another go (and getting cake at the end again!) but it would have been stupid of me to dose up on ibuprofen and do that – I might have put myself out of action completely. But I still have the Vale of York Half in September to look forward to. Instead I went out for a very slow, flat two hour trot. I’m going to practise eating various foods on the hoof over the next few weeks, especially savoury ones, as I think I’ll get sick of sweet stuff over the course of 100K. Yesterday it was salty crackers, which went down really well – easy to digest and I think the salt would be useful on a warm day in July. Isn’t ultra running all about the eating?! Anyway, here I am chomping one down – my selfie skills don’t get any better!

 

So that’s where I am for now. This week I’m planning to do just a couple of very short, gentle runs to keep my legs turning, but also go to flow yoga twice to try and build some extra strength and flexibility. Then I’ll see how I feel next weekend. It’s frustrating and a bit worrying not to be training completely how I should be for now, but I’m hoping my cycle of marathon training will stand me in good stead fitness-wise. I don’t need to get any faster, just stronger!

Thanks for reading. If you’d like to make a donation to my fund for Cancer Research UK you can do so here and read about my personal reasons for raising money for them here.

 

 

 

 

In the past I’ve done quite a bit of running for charity; the first time was back in 2009 when I first started running and the OH and I both did the first ever Run for All York 10K in aid of the Jane Tomlinson Appeal. That was a big deal at the time! I also did the Great North Run for Martin House Hospice. Then, as I started to do more and more running, I realised that I couldn’t expect people to cough up every time I took part in an event.

 

However, I’ve recently realised that I haven’t done anything for charity for nearly three years, when I ran the Berlin Marathon and the OH rode L’Etape du Tour for Children With Cancer.

 

So I thought I should give it another go; but as nobody is that impressed when I run a marathon any more (and rightly so!) I knew I’d have to go the extra mile this time to get people to part with their hard-earned cash. Actually, quite a few extra miles…

 

I’ve been tempted to enter Race to the Stones ever since I heard about it last year. It’s a hilly ultra of 100K (or 62 miles in old money) that takes place in July and follows the Ridgeway trail from Lewknor to the ancient stone circle at Avebury. Not only does it look like a great event, but Cancer Research UK have charity places, so it was an ideal opportunity to take on my first 100K and support a cause that’s very close to my heart at the same time. Here’s why I’m running for CRUK.

 

There’s always been quite a lot of cancer on my mum’s side of the family. She and her two sisters (my aunties) all had breast cancer at a relatively early age, and her brother (my uncle) had prostate cancer. When my cousin also developed breast cancer recently she was offered BRCA2 genetic testing because it was suspected that we might have it in the family. Unfortunately her result came back positive, so we knew for sure that BRCA2 was around and that there was a 50% chance others would have it. That left me and my siblings and cousins with a decision to make. Should we also get tested and find out if we had the gene? For me it wasn’t a hard decision to make. I try to live (mostly) healthily to reduce my risk of developing long term health conditions. We all know that you’re less likely to get cancer if you don’t smoke, maintain a healthy weight and exercise. But you can’t fight genetics. Having the BRCA2 gene seriously increases your risk of developing breast, ovarian and prostate cancer. However, women with the BRCA2 gene have the option of undergoing risk-reducing surgery that ultimately makes them less likely than the general population to develop breast cancer. For men it’s a bit trickier as there isn’t much you can do to prevent prostate cancer apart from keep an eye on things.

Rather than living with uncertainty, I felt I had to know. I saw a genetic counsellor at York Hospital, who was lovely, and had a simple blood test. Fortunately for me the result came back negative. I felt a strange mixture of emotions at hearing the news; obviously happy and relieved, but at the same time a bit guilty that I’d ‘got away with it’ when my cousin hadn’t – although the good news is that she had the surgery and is doing really well, and another of my female cousins has, like me, tested negative. The bad news is I won’t get a free ‘Angelina’ boob job on the NHS! Others in my family haven’t yet taken the plunge to find out. It’s a difficult decision to make, so I respect their choice, but obviously it affects future generations as well as yourself.

So that’s my very personal reason for supporting CRUK, although I’ve been lucky so far. Well known for their ground-breaking research – the BRCA2 gene was actually discovered by a CRUK-funded team – it also does a lot of brilliant work to support those affected by cancer, as well as educating people about cancer, which is why I’m supporting them. Even though you can’t change your genes, educating people about how to avoid cancer is so important. CRUK also has a wealth of useful resources on its website that anyone can access.

Thanks for reading this far if you have! I’ll be blogging a bit about my ultra training between now and Race to the Stones on 15th July. If you’d like to donate to my Just Giving page and help CRUK you can do so here. We’d both really appreciate it!

 

 

It’s not often I write about things I’m doing in the course of my work on the public health team at City of York Council (maybe I should?), but I just wanted to tell you about a project I’ve been helping with recently.

Launched this week, Breathe 2025 is an initiative supported by Public Health England and various local authorities with the ambitious aim of creating a smokefree future for the next generation of children in Yorkshire and the Humber. The idea is that in ten years’ time smoking will be unusual, and hopefully a thing of the past for young people.

Breathe Logo

Breathe 2025 is asking people and organisations to show their support by going to the campaign website or Facebook page and signing up to one or more simple, practical actions. This could be pledging to watch and share the Breathe 2025 video, or promising to display a Breathe 2025 poster. There are a range of simple actions to choose from, as individuals or on behalf of an organisation such as a school, GP or local business.

Smoking is still the greatest single cause of early death, killing around 100,000 people in the UK each year – an astonishing figure! And of course, the strain this puts on the NHS is huge. As most people start to smoke before the age of 18, it’s vital to target potential smokers at an early age, before they take it up and it becomes a habit. Although Yorkshire and the Humber has the highest adult smoking prevalence in England (20.1% compared to an England average of 18%), the good news is that only one in eight 15-year-olds smoke and the proportion of young smokers is dropping. Within the next decade there could even be a generation of children that don’t smoke. How amazing would that be?

I think Breathe 2025 is a great idea and am happy to be supporting it. You can do the same by visiting its website.

Breathe Child

 

 

About a month ago my mum was diagnosed with bowel cancer. On Monday she had an operation to remove a large tumour in her colon, plus part of the upper bowel itself. Thankfully this went really well, and hopefully Mum’s now on the way to a full recovery. It’s been a great shock to our family – the old trout drives me nuts sometimes, but I love her and don’t want her to die! However, the most shocking thing about her diagnosis was that she’d had no obvious symptoms at all; but she’s diabetic and at one of her regular check-ups a blood test revealed that she was anaemic, so she was sent for the colonoscopy that picked up the tumour. Much as we sometimes moan about the NHS, Mum was treated swiftly, efficiently and considerately by a team of amazingly skilled and caring people at York Hospital, led by the fantastic colorectal consultant surgeon Mr Ian Bradford who is, quite simply, a top bloke.

Bowel cancer can be treated very successfully with early detection. But people are still often too embarrassed to go to their doctor with symptoms that involve things like bottoms and poo. A great deal of good work has been done by charities like Beating Bowel Cancer to raise awareness, but comments such as those made recently by a GP about his surgery being cluttered up with the so-called ‘worried well’ don’t exactly encourage patients to air their concerns.

 Just as a refresher, the main symptoms of bowel cancer are:

  •  Bleeding from the bottom
  • A change in bowel habit lasting more than three weeks
  • Abdominal pain – especially if severe
  • A lump in your tummy
  • Unexplained weight loss or tiredness.

If you have any of the above, please don’t hesitate to see your doctor. The vast majority will be happy to discuss them, arrange any appropriate tests and (hopefully) put your mind at rest; and if the worst happens you’ll be treated sooner rather than later, with a much greater chance of recovery.

There’s also quite a bit you can do to lessen your chances of developing bowel cancer. Obviously exercising and not smoking are good for preventing any cancer, but diet has a big part to play in bowel cancer prevention. Eating less red and processed meat, cutting down on animal fat in general and eating more fish and fibre all help to maintain a healthy gut.

For anyone worried about or affected by bowel cancer, there’s some good information on the NHS website. I wish you well and hope you have a successful outcome.

Most of all, please don’t be embarrassed by poos – we all do them!