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At the risk of stating the bleeding obvious (© Basil Fawlty) it’s been hot over the last few days. Not just the sort of hot where it’s really just a bit warm but we do that optimistic, British thing of pretending it’s hotter than it is, but properly hot. Hot like on your summer holidays abroad hot. By and large we like hot and all that goes with it (sunbathing, drinking Pimms, eating ice lollies, having barbecues etc.) so hot is a good thing… except for when you want to go running. Then it’s a sticky, sweaty, bad thing!

Obviously the best way to overcome this is to put on your shorts and vest and go out early or late in the day when it’s not so hot. But here’s the thing… even when the weather’s boiling I still see lots of women wearing capris, long tights or (last Sunday) thick jogging bottoms. As far as I can work out the only reason for this must be that they think they’re too fat/white/dimply to wear shorts. This never happens with men, who seem to wear shorts all year round with no trouble at all, whatever they look like. Most of them seem to view it as a sign of weakness to wear tights, even in the depths of winter! It’s just we women who’ve been conditioned into thinking we mustn’t display our bare legs unless they look like Elle McPherson’s. And as only 0.00001% of us actually have legs like Elle McPherson’s this has to stop.

Yes she looks hot, but has she ever done the Manchester Marathon? I think not.

 Obviously I’d love to have legs like Elle’s, but as God saw fit to create me a short ginger rather than a willowy beach goddess, I’ve come to accept that this is now unlikely ever to happen. But I don’t see why I should be condemned to having an unpleasantly sweaty lower half when I run just because this is the case. Running is about feeling happy and carefree, and it’s difficult to feel that way when a pool of sweat is gathering around your lady parts. Comfort is paramount, especially on long marathon training runs! So I guess what I’m saying is please don’t feel you can’t wear shorts just because your legs aren’t perfect, because very few people have perfect legs. If people look at you when you’re out running they probably aren’t thinking “My God, look at her fat legs” but rather “Good for her, I wish I could do that”. I’ve decided to make a point of wearing shorts whenever it’s warm enough now, because if a woman in sweaty capris looks at me and thinks “Well if she can wear shorts with her pasty stumps, I certainly can” that would make me very happy.

Short, white and (in this case) wet!

So remember girls, you are entitled to wear shorts for no other reason than you are a runner, and that automatically means you are fabulous and look great. Just do it! Enjoy your summer running – be comfortable and carefree!

I’m so obsessed with running these days I sometimes forget that until about four years ago I was, if anything, a cyclist. Didn’t own a pair of running shoes, had never run so much as a 5K and went out on my bike most Sundays. Even managed to bag a couple of Alpine cols over the years! Then I caught the running bug and cycling definitely began to play second fiddle. Apart from anything else, running seemed much quicker and easier to fit into my working day. I could probably count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I went out on my road bike last year, to the point where my cycling-mad husband threatened to put it on Ebay! My cycling was reduced to popping into town on my mountain bike.

Back in the day!

 It was only when I began to train for the Manchester Marathon earlier this year that I began to realise how cycling could actually complement my running. The training plan I chose, the Women’s Running Beginner’s Plan, included some aerobic cross-training, so cycling fitted into it really well. Instead of a Monday recovery run after Sunday’s long run I’d go on a 30 minute bike ride; then mid-week there was a longer cycling session, into which I tried to work a few small hills.

 It’s easy to think that when you’re training for a marathon that all you should do is just run as many miles as you possibly can. Obviously running is very important! But in fact your heart and lungs can’t tell the difference between running, cycling, swimming or any other aerobic activity, so it all builds extra fitness – and without the impact on your joints of pounding the pavements. What it won’t do, however, is get you used to being on your feet for a long time, so you can’t substitute all running with cross-training!

The training schedule I’ve chosen for the York Marathon is the Women’s Running Improver Plan. It includes some much cross-training, but I’ve also decided to continue to substitute cycling for all the recovery runs as that seemed to work really well last time. The way I see it, recovery runs are about getting your muscles moving gently to aid repair, and cycling can do that just as well as running.

Since the Manchester Marathon at the end of April I’ve been doing less running and more cycling in preparation for the holiday in France I’ve just been on, where cycling through the lovely scenery of Provence was the order of the day. I’m hoping the hilly terrain will have acted kind of like interval training for my heart and lungs… but now the bike must take a back seat again as I need to get my legs back into running mode before my 14-week Yorkshire Marathon training programme starts on 15th July. Can’t wait!

I’d love to know what others think about cross-training. Do you do it?

Holiday cycling. Yes, those white shorts were a mistake. Not helped by the croissants!

 

So, marathon training has finally begun! For those of you who don’t already know, I’ve decided to celebrate the year of my 50th birthday (there, I’ve said it!) by taking part in my first marathon, which will be the Greater Manchester Marathon on 28th April. And if that goes OK I’ll also be doing the Plusnet Yorkshire Marathon in October too. “Why has the old bird left it so late in life to start marathon running?” I hear you thinking. Well yes, I guess I have, but as I only started running three years ago I haven’t really felt ready to give it a go until now. Besides, I think that to a certain extent age is just a number and I fully intend to ignore being ancient for as long as I possibly can!

I’ve decided to follow the 16 week beginner’s programme devised by Women’s Running magazine coach Phoebe Thomas, partly because it includes quite a bit of cross-training, but mostly because Phoebe is a redhead like me, so she must be OK! However, for the first two weeks of the schedule I was actually tapering for the Brass Monkey Half Marathon, which was supposed to take place here in York on 20th January, but was unfortunately (but understandably) cancelled due to bad weather for the first time in its 31 year history. We were still allowed to pick up our souvenir running tops, but I haven’t worn it yet as I don’t really feel I’ve earned it!

I would have run it, honest!

So, after the Brass Monkey I jumped from the Week 12 taper of a half marathon plan onto Week 3 of the marathon plan. I thought I’d need to take things easy the week after the Brass Monkey, but as it never happened I cracked straight on! In fact it was actually an easier week than those I’d had over Christmas, but that’s no bad thing. Here’s what the training plan looks like: 

 I’m now on week 4. As you can see, there are actually only three days a week when you have to run. I’m glad about the cross training because I haven’t done any proper bike riding for a while, and also because Steve and I are hoping to go to Italy in May to watch a bit of the Giro d’Italia and let Steve have his big birthday treat – riding up the Passo dello Stelvio, a classic Giro climb. Not sure I’ll be up to that, but I’ll certainly do some riding. So Phoebe’s cross training will help me aerobically for running but also prepare my legs for our hols. Friday, the only real rest day on the schedule, is the only day of the week I’m office-bound. So, fingers crossed, it should all come together quite nicely – for now! Of course, once the mileage starts to creep beyond half marathon level I’ve no idea how things will go or how me poor old bones will cope with the training, so I certainly don’t want to get complacent.

This week I’ve also started going to a Core Toning class at York Yoga Studio for the first time, which is supposed to really help build up the right kind of strength for good running style; this is apparently very important when you’re planning to run 26.2 miles! It was hard work but great fun and highlighted some areas I need to work on and strengthen. Then there’s nutrition… obviously I usually eat a fairly healthy diet anyway, but I’ve been looking at areas where I can tailor it a bit to suit my marathon training – more on both of these things in further blog posts.

If anyone’s looking for some reading matter to help with their marathon training I can recommend the Women’s Running Marathon Training Guide, which has plans for runners of all abilities and loads of great advice.

 So, I’ll post more about how I’m getting on at the end of February. I always love to hear how other people are getting on with their marathon training, especially women and first-timers, so if I’m not already following you on Twitter please let me know. And good luck with your training, whatever goal you’ve lined up for spring! Anyone else waiting to hear whether they’ve got into the Great North Run? Fingers crossed! Still just time to enter the ballot…

 

 

Gooooaal! We’ve all set one for the new year haven’t we? Losing weight, giving up fags, going to the gym, abstaining from the demon drink… everyone’s at it, so I thought I’d better set one too. And mine’s going to be (ta dah!) running a marathon. Or, more accurately, attempting to. I actually decided to give it a go after last year’s Great North Run. That was the first time I’d ever run a half marathon and felt that carrying on for a bit longer wouldn’t be the worst thing that could possibly happen.

Not quite knackered!

I’d entered the London Marathon ballot (well you do, don’t you) but didn’t get in – no surprise there – so fished around for an alternative. Manchester seemed the obvious option, being not too far from home; I didn’t want to spend a fortune travelling to some far-flung event when I didn’t even know whether I’d make it to the finish line! Plus I was born about a quarter of a mile from Old Trafford, where the race starts and ends. That has to be a good sign, doesn’t it? Or perhaps at the back of my mind I had a vague notion that David Beckham would be handing out the finishers’ medals. Anyhow, before I knew it, one October evening I’d had a couple of glasses of wine and entered. Warning: never drink and look for races online!

You never know!

I also entered the Brass Monkey Half Marathon, which is here in York next weekend, hoping this would keep me running and steer me away from the wine and chocs over the festive period. Of course I still indulged a bit. I blame my mother-in-law; she makes the most fantastic mince pies and Christmas puddings. But I certainly drank less booze than usual, and tried to time it not to interfere too much with tempo and longer Sunday runs. On Sunday 30th December I ran twelve miles, went dancing at the Craig Charles Funk & Soul Show, then walked two miles home from town – I consider that a pretty good training day! I calculated that after the Brass Monkey I’d move on to week three of my sixteen week marathon training programme and would actually have a bit of a head start.

 

So, just as everything was sorted in my head, the new Yorkshire Marathon was launched this week to much fanfare and excitement. How could I possibly resist the lure of that? Obviously I entered straight away! And it’s great to see so many other local first-timers signing up too – it’s like we’re all in it together!

So now, even though I’ve never actually run a marathon yet, I’m entered into two and beginning to doubt my sanity. Had I known earlier about the York marathon I wouldn’t have entered Manchester, but now it seems like serendipity or fate that the two events are being held in the city where I was born and the city where I live. It’s a challenge for 2013 alright! I’ll keep you posted on my training progress – fingers crossed. In the meantime it’s Brass Monkey tapering for now. Oh, and did I mention I have a big birthday coming up this year? Don’t tell anyone will you, I’m keeping it quiet…

 What are your health goals (running or otherwise) for 2013? I’d love to hear about them. Good luck whatever they are. And please follow me on Twitter if you’re doing the Manchester or Yorkshire marathons, it would be great to make contact! x

Have you seen the latest figures on childhood obesity, stating that one in three children leave primary school overweight? Shocking, isn’t it? It’s easy to blame parents for this, but in truth it can often be difficult to prise kids away from their computers, iPads, Nintendos, smartphones etc to do some exercise; and the older they get, the harder it can be! When I was asked to review The Ice Factor in York it occurred to me that this could be a fun way to get your kids involved in some exercise over the Christmas holidays, so duly enlisted my stepdaughter Milly, 14, and her friend Britney to come along and give feedback – they didn’t need much persuading! And of course hubby/dad Steve didn’t want to be left out. This award-winning seasonal attraction is apparently the largest outdoor skating rink in the north of England so we had high hopes of a good time.

The Ice Factor is certainly easy to get to, based at the York Designer Outlet Centre where the A64 meets the A19, and there’s ample free parking on site. We’d booked onto the 1pm session, so popped for a bite to eat in the centre’s food court beforehand. Obviously McDonald’s is the dining destination of choice for most teenagers, but relatively healthy options such as Bagel Nash and Spud-U-Like are available if you can persuade them!

Milly (left) and Britney booting up!

After lunch we went to (quite literally) get our skates on. A word of warning – if you have a bag with you, leave it in the car or the Ice Factor cloakroom, because they aren’t allowed on the ice. Boots were strapped on as a palpable sense of excitement grew in the air and a crowd formed near the door onto the ice, dying to get out. Finally we were released – not without humour, as most people immediately clung for dear life to the barrier at the side of the rink. I admit I was initially amongst them as it’s many years since I’ve been ice skating! But, as cyclist Steve noted, it’s a bit like riding a bike, and one by one people took the leap of faith onto the ice and set off – some more successfully than others!

The girls soon get the hang of it!

Milly and Britney were soon out on their own, holding hands and gliding around quite confidently. There was a huge variety of people at this session, ranging in age from tiny tots through to adults – mostly parents accompanying children. Little ones can make use of the penguin skate aids supplied, which basically enable them to be pushed around the ice by a fully-grown skater. But I would say that the overriding demographic was indeed teenagers, in pairs or groups, all seemingly having a great time no matter what their skating ability. Boys were obviously keen to show off, with the girls taking it a bit less seriously. After a few fairly gentle laps I was surprised to find my feet aching quite a bit, and realised I’d been tensely scrunching them up, like a parrot clinging to a perch! So I tried to relax a bit and felt a lot more comfortable.

Wait for me!

The setting of the rink is quite attractive, with a huge Christmas tree in the middle and a sort of grotto with big sparkly reindeer at one side. For those who’d rather watch than do, there’s a raised viewing platform and a rinkside café that looked nice but surprisingly quiet for lunchtime. It’s worth emphasising that the Ice Factor does consist of actual ice, not the plastic stuff that many temporary rinks are made of these days. The ice in one corner of the rink seemed a little bit lumpy, but I guess that’s maybe the price you pay for having the real thing! Music was playing, but we could hardly hear it; I’m guessing the teenagers would have liked it louder, but maybe it’s turned up at night, when the atmosphere is probably a bit more club-like. Skating marshals are on hand to ensure nobody gets too carried away, or in case of emergency.

 The hour seemed to pass really quickly – I guess because we were enjoying ourselves. It was sad to see that there were a few people who never actually left the barrier to skate – I’m sure they just lacked confidence rather than ability! Milly and Britney did fall over once, but didn’t seem to mind. I was surprised I managed to stay upright for the full hour; possibly because I wasn’t too ambitious, but I was trundling round pretty well by the end.

Just like riding a bike?!

 So what was our verdict? Well the girls certainly had a fab time and are thinking of going again with a group of their friends. It’s handy that they can get there from York by bus. Steve and I also had fun, although skating once a year is probably enough for us! We certainly all laughed a lot, both at each other and other people! As a form of exercise it wouldn’t be cheap to do on a regular basis, but if it can get children outside, being active and enjoying the fresh air maybe it could inspire them to do something else… like going for a walk? You never know!

The Ice Factor is part of the Winter Wonderland at the Designer Outlet, which also has a traditional funfair and a Santa’s grotto. If you have any last-minute Christmas shopping to do you could always deposit older kids there while you get on with it! It would also be a great place to take any visitors you might have over Christmas, for a family trip when the kids get bored over the holidays, or even a date with a difference. It’s definitely fun for grown-ups as well as kids!

For further info or to book a skating session visit the York Designer Outlet website.

 

So, your autumn half marathon is getting closer and closer. Exciting – but maybe a bit scary for some? Perhaps you’re worried that you haven’t done enough training… or even started yet? Well don’t panic! There’s still time to improve your performance quite a bit before the big day. I’m sure we’ve all been inspired recently by the fantastic athletes at the Olympics, so here are some tips to help you out. I wrote them for the Martin House Hospice Great North Run team but hopefully they can help others too. They’re not aimed at elite athletes, but ordinary people (like me) who just want to do their best and maybe raise some cash too!

  •  Get Good Shoes

The most important thing you can do to help your training is to kit yourself out with the right shoes if you haven’t done so already. Running long distances in shoes that are badly-fitting and/or don’t suit your style will hold you back and could even cause injury. Rather than popping into your nearest discount sportswear store and choosing shoes that are a cool colour or on special offer, pay a visit to a specialist running shop such as Up and Running in York and have your gait analysed. Yes, it’s a bit embarrassing running on the in-store treadmill, but the guys there are experts at matching shoes to people and can also dish out great advice on all aspects of running. Go during the week when it’s a bit less busy if you feel self-conscious! 

  • Have a Goal

Think about why you signed up for the run. Is your aim just to have fun and raise some money or to get the best time you possibly can? Your own personal goals will dictate how much training you want to do. If you’re going to wear fancy dress and walk round with a collecting bucket, putting in lots of miles and sprinting up hills won’t need to play a huge part in your training! But if you want to push yourself and/or achieve a particular time you’ll need to put some effort in to do yourself justice. 

  • Stick to a Schedule

If you’re up for some proper training it’s good to have some structure to it. If you only have a vague idea of when you might run a couple of times in the week it’s more likely to get pushed into the background than if you have a schedule. I tend to use the Bupa one recommended by the GNR, but there’s also a good one at Runner’s World or on many other websites. Pick one that you can personalise to suit your ability and that suits your lifestyle and the amount of time you have to devote to training. I find that it helps to write training sessions in my diary in red, then they’re harder to ignore! 

  • Mix It Up

Training isn’t all about running as many miles as possible. As well as one run where you gradually increase your distance each week, it’s also good to do a couple of shorter, faster sessions where you can do work such as tempo (incorporating periods of running faster than your comfortable pace), sprints and hills. The long runs build up your stamina and the shorter ones make you stronger. Hopefully on race day the two come together! I’d really recommend doing some hills as there’s a hill in the GNR at about mile 11 that came as a bit of an unwelcome surprise to my tired legs the first time I did it! 

  • Rest and Recover

Training well will improve your running, but don’t overdo it, as being injured will only set you back. If you do pick up an injury don’t be tempted to carry on regardless – rest for a couple of days, then see how you feel. If it’s gone, carry on; if not, you may wish to consider seeing a sports therapist. Stretching really helps to avoid injury especially if (like me) you aren’t exactly a spring chicken! It’s good to do dynamic stretching before you run and static stretching afterwards – you can Google to find examples of these. If you feel unwell, don’t force yourself to train; your body can’t fight germs and recover from training at the same time, so you’ll only prolong your illness. Rest as much as possible until you feel better. If you train too hard you’re actually more likely to get ill because your immune system is temporarily lowered when your body is concentrating on recovery. 

  • Look After Yourself

You’ll find that you perform much better if you eat and sleep well. Think of your body as a performance car – you wouldn’t put diesel in a Ferrari would you?! The better you feed it, the more efficiently it works. If you’re a bit overweight it’s a good opportunity to lose a few pounds so you’ll have a bit less to carry around the course! When you get to the hardest weeks of your training (probably weeks 8-10) try to get as much sleep as you can too, as this is when your body recovers best. If you drink quite a bit of alcohol you’ll find it helps to reduce this, as its after-effects linger in your body long after you’ve stopped feeling hung over. I’m not going to be a spoilsport and say never have a drink, just be moderate or time it around your running schedule – so that’s a glass of wine on a Wednesday, Friday or Sunday for me! And drink plenty of water too, as dehydration can have a dramatic effect on physical performance; your wee should be a pale straw colour. 

  • Move To The Music

Research has claimed that listening to music can improve your sporting performance by as much as 20%. I’m not sure if that’s true for me, but it certainly helps, and if one of your favourite tunes comes on just as the going gets tough it certainly does give you a boost! So if you haven’t tried it before, give it a go. 

I’m now on week seven of my twelve week Great North Run schedule and it seems to be going OK, fingers crossed. I’d love to link up on Twitter with other GNR Tweeps, so do give me a shout if you’re out there! If you’d like to sponsor me and help out a great cause please visit my Just Giving page. Have a great weekend, especially if you’re running!

Who thinks this is massively ironic? Just as we’re all enjoying the Olympics and feeling inspired by the awesome athletes a new study has revealed that the UK is the third laziest nation in Europe, with around two thirds of adults failing to take the amount of exercise recommended to stay healthy. To be honest this figure surprised me. Looking around at the general public I’d have thought the number of lazy people would be much higher. I’m constantly amazed at how many people, both adults and (more worryingly) children seem to be overweight; and more amazed by how many of them don’t seem that bothered about it.

 Apparently inactivity is now as big a threat to our health as smoking. Modern life means we just don’t need to move around as much as we used to – but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t! Lack of exercise can contribute to some of the most dangerous threats to our health, such as cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, but many people seem to think those things will never happen to them, making no effort to change their lazy lifestyle until they day they actually keel over with a heart attack – assuming they survive it. The problem is that we all like an easy life, and it’s easier not to exercise than to do it!

 Often when I’m trying to persuade people to exercise during a wellness evaluation they come up with excuses as to why they shouldn’t or can’t. Here are some of the most common.

 “I don’t like exercise.”

Really? How do you know if you haven’t tried it? The only people who ever say this are those who’ve never exercised regularly. There’s an activity for everyone out there – try a few different ones until you find something you like!

 “I don’t have time to exercise.”

Hmm. Do you have time to do any of the following? Watch telly/spend an afternoon browsing the shops/chat to your friends on the phone for an hour/go to the pub/play computer games/bake cakes/get your nails done… you get the picture. You do have time to exercise – if you want to. It’s all about priorities.

 “I’m too tired to exercise.”

Then you need to start by getting more sleep. Or maybe you’re just brain tired from work or stress, in which case exercise will re-energise and invigorate you, making you feel less tired.

 “I work full time.”

And you don’t get a lunch hour? Then what about going to bed an hour earlier and getting up an hour earlier to exercise.

 “I have kids.”

Then get your partner to look after them for half an hour – it won’t kill them. If you don’t have a partner, ask someone else (mum, friend etc) to watch the kids for half an hour while you exercise – you can always return the favour. Or get a DVD and do something when they’ve gone to bed!

 This is my favourite: “My boobs are too big!”

Admittedly, running might be a bit of a problem if you’re built like Katie Price! But there are loads of other activities to choose from. Try something that supports your weight, like swimming or cycling. A lot of that excess boobage may be fat that will reduce as you become slimmer.

 The thing is, you can always find a reason not to exercise. Even I can do that some days. You’ll never regret exercising, but if you don’t you might wish you had in years to come. You don’t have to do it to Olympic standards!

Well it’s that time of year again, when the Great North Run begins to loom large and I have to get my finger out and do some proper training! Actually this will be the third time I’ve done it, so I have a much better idea of what to expect now than when I first did it in 2010 – that was my first half marathon and a very steep learning curve! I didn’t do any fundraising that year as I wasn’t even sure I’d complete it, but last year thanks to the generosity of my friends and family I managed to raise over £500 for my friend Angie Grinham’s appeal for the Breast Cancer Care unit at York Hospital.

 

This year I didn’t get in through the general ballot, so wanted to take a charity place and decided to run for Martin House Children’s Hospice in Boston Spa. The folks there do amazing work caring for children and young adults with progressive, life-limiting illnesses, and also give invaluable support to their families. Please have a look at the Martin House website to read more about the brilliant job they do there. Of course, despite being an absolute godsend, hospices have to raise nearly all the money they need to keep going, so I do think this is a really worthy cause to support.

This year I’ve been quite organised with my training, and doing the Leeds Half Marathon in May certainly helped get me off to a good start. I’m now on week five of a twelve week programme, and the Jane Tomlinson Run For All York 10K on 5th August will be a good opportunity to check on progress – I just hope it isn’t as hot as it was last year! It’s also the day of the Olympic Women’s Marathon, which I can’t wait to watch afterwards as I eat a big post-race brekkie. I’m still not convinced I could run a marathon myself, but might just give it a go next year as I have a big birthday coming up – don’t quote me on that though! Entry is still open for the 10K if anyone fancies it, and the For All Events team is looking for volunteer marshals too if any non-runners would like to help out.

If you’d like to make a donation to Martin House please visit my Just Giving page, or give me a shout if you’d prefer to donate by cheque or in cash. I’d be very grateful and so will they! Thanks for reading and watch this space to find out how I get on.

Last week I reviewed the bingo wing-busting Powerspin – and this week you can win it! Apparently most women, especially over a certain age, do hate their upper arms, so if you want to get yours honed to Michelle Obama-like perfection before the summer hols, here’s your chance! It’s great for abs too.

To be in with a chance to win just leave a comment below telling me your top summer health tip by the end of next Tuesday, 5th June. I’ll pick out the one I like best and announce the winner on Wednesday 6th.

Good luck!

If the arrival of warm weather (at last!) has you dreading the thought of exposing your arms you’ll be interested in a new exercise gadget I’ve been sent to review – the Powerspin! A huge number of women seem to hate their arms; although it’s one of the few body parts I’m not really concerned about, as my own limbs seem to put on muscle far too easily. When I once went through a phase of doing lots of yoga my sister kindly told me I was starting to look like Madonna – and who really wants Madge’s scrawny old arms?!

Anyway the PR blurb with the Powerspin claims it’s ‘the world’s easiest pick up and use exercise device’ that will ‘banish bingo wings’. So far so good! It’s basically a lightweight circular tube with a handle across the middle and a steel ball that spins around inside.

 

The idea is that you use it in a variety of ways to tone the arms, chest and abs. I’ve given it a good test and I can certainly vouch for the fact that it gives the arms a pretty good workout! It took me a while to get to grips with the spinning technique, but then I’m not the world’s most co-ordinated person. It’s a bit like hula hooping with your arms really. Once I’d got the knack it was quite good fun, and you can definitely feel it working your abs too. I could see all the muscles in my arms standing out as I used it, so it must have been doing something for them! It certainly seemed more interesting than lifting weights.

Apparently you can use the Powerspin in front of the TV (yes, good multi-tasking – although you’d probably need to turn the volume up), on the phone (er, not sure I could hold a conversation at the same time) or when making dinner (dear me no, that’s definitely a health and safety incident waiting to happen!). And it’s not just for girls – men can use it to build up their arms too, and I imagine kids would love it! Personally I think I’ll be sticking to pulling on my bars as I pedal uphill to tone the old bingo wings, but if you can’t be bothered to bike or prefer couch-based exercise the Powerspin is probably a useful alternative. Next week I’ll be running a competition on the blog to win it, so watch this space!